Winter activities, part 2: Barn Hunt

barn-hunt

By Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA

In part one of my Winter Activities series, I talked about agility and the great exercise it is for your dog. In part two, I am going to talk about the sport of Barn Hunt.

As I mentioned in my previous post, I was not a big fan of being out in the cold for long periods of time, trying to give my dog some exercise. So I was always trying to come up with new ways to exercise my dog without freezing to death. Barn hunt is another great way to stay indoors and out of the cold.

Barn hunt, to put it simply, is a maze made out of straw bales. Within that maze are plastic tubes containing live rats and mice and the goal is for the dog to tunnel through the maze to find the live rats all in a specific amount of time.

I know what you are thinking. “Poor rats! I can’t believe they allow dogs to run after rats.” Let me specify, no rats or mice are hurt during this course. They are safely protected within the plastic containers. Barn hunt allows dogs, specifically terriers, to practice what they were bred to do, which is to find rats.

“Terrier” means “earth” in Latin. Terriers were bred to hunt vermin and even though many don’t have a need to hunt vermin these days, they still have that instinct, so a sport such as barn hunt is great for them. But terriers aren’t the only dogs that can participate. Any dog over six months in age and able to crawl through an 18-inch bale-height tall tunnel made of straw, can participate.

The reason I love barn hunt is because it gives dogs plenty of exercise. They have to run through a maze. They are using their nose, which is great for burning energy, and they are doing something that they were bred for.

There are plenty of associations around the country to join, so you can participate in classes with your dog. If you decide to compete, there are competitions all around the country as well as “fun trials.” If you are interested in competing take a look at the Barn Hunt Rule Book and website.

No matter what you decide to do, barn hunt is a great way to bond with your dog and get some exercise.

Have you tried barn hunt? What was your experience?

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Erin Schneider 250x300Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA and owner of Touch Dog Training, is a certified professional dog trainer who employs positive reinforcement behavior modification techniques intended to deliver results while building stronger bonds between dogs and their owners. Erin practiced her craft in Chicago for many years as a Senior Trainer for AnimalSense Canine Training & Behavior. There she taught dog training classes and also conducted private, in-home lessons with pets and their owners. In March 2015, Erin relocated to Colorado and is excited to share her knowledge and expertise with dog owners in the Denver/Boulder metro area.

Winter activities, part 1: Agility

agility

By Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA

Winter is going to be here for real before we know it. I don’t know about you, but I did not enjoy walking my dog, Bailey, in the freezing cold. Of course I did it, but I liked to keep it short.

She, on the other hand, could stay out in the cold all day. She loved the cold weather. Since I am not covered in fur, I had to find ways to exercise my dog without freezing to death. That is when I came across indoor sports.

In this multi-part series, I am going to discuss the magical world of indoor dog sports, which are especially great during the cold months.

I’ll begin by talking about agility. Agility is one of my favorite sports. It has really picked up enthusiasm over the years, so it is pretty easy to find a facility that offers classes in your area.

For those of you that aren’t familiar with agility, Wikipedia defines it as “a dog sport in which a handler directs a dog through an obstacle course in a race for both time and accuracy.” Some of the obstacles consist of the following: A-frame, weave poles, tire jump, jumps, tunnel, dog walk, seesaw, pause table, etc.

Agility is a great way to tire your dog out. It requires a lot of running and mental stimulation. You, the handler, also do some running, so it is best if you are physically able. You can either take agility classes for fun or if you get serious about it, for competition. I only participated with Bailey for fun. She wasn’t the best at it (she got distracted very easily), but she loved the treats and extra attention at the end of each course.

For those of you that decide to compete, you will have to work at it. There are rules to follow and time to keep perfecting. But competitions are a lot of fun. There is a great atmosphere and a lot of camaraderie. If you are interested in competing, take a look at the Agility Rule Book and website from the AKC.

No matter what you decide to do, agility is a great way to bond with your dog and get some exercise for both you and your four-legged companion. And it will keep you out of the cold for an evening, which is reason enough for me.

Have you tried agility? What was your experience?

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Erin with baileyErin Schneider, CPDT-KA and owner of Touch Dog Training, is a certified professional dog trainer who employs positive reinforcement behavior modification techniques intended to deliver results while building stronger bonds between dogs and their owners. Erin practiced her craft in Chicago for many years as a Senior Trainer for AnimalSense Canine Training & Behavior. There she taught dog training classes and also conducted private, in-home lessons with pets and their owners. In March 2015, Erin relocated to Colorado and is excited to share her knowledge and expertise with dog owners in the Denver/Boulder metro area.

 

 

 

Winter activities, part 5: Dock Diving

dock-diving

By Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA

In part 4 of my Winter Activities series, I talked about Rally and how much fun it can be working on obedience. In part 5, I am going to talk about the sport of Dock Diving.

When you think of Dock Diving, you probably think of it as a summer sport. But one of the nice things about Dock Diving is that it can be done anytime of the year, indoors.

So what is Dock Diving, you ask? Wikipedia explains it as “a dog sport in which dogs compete in jumping for distance or height from a dock into a body of water.”

If you have ever watched it on TV, you will see a toy being used to help lure the dog into the water. The toy is either used to “chase” or to “place and send,” and the dog is judged on the distance they jump.

“Chase” means the handler places the dog in a sit stay on the dock, then the handler releases the dog, throws the toy into the pool as the dog runs towards it. To “place and send” means the handler walks the dog to the end of the dock, the toy is thrown into the pool, and the handler lets the dog mark it. Then the dog is walked back to the beginning of the dock and then released to fetch the toy.

If you are interested in getting your dog into Dock Diving, you should do a few things before getting started. First, make sure your dog likes the water and can swim. Dock Diving is open to all breeds of dogs, but breeds such as Frenchies and Bulldogs aren’t good swimmers, so know your dog. Second, make sure that they have good toy drive. If toys don’t excite your dog, they might not have the drive to run into a pool of water to retrieve one.

Bailey wasn’t a water dog, so this would have been torture instead of fun. So, I never participated in dock diving. But it always looked so fun – and what a great way to exercise your dog! I know many a water dog that would love this sport.

If you are interested in taking a class or competing, check out the North American Diving Dogs website. Just be ready for a soggy doggy, and have fun!

Have you ever tried Dock Diving with your dog?

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Erin Schneider 250x300Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA and owner of Touch Dog Training, is a certified professional dog trainer who employs positive reinforcement behavior modification techniques intended to deliver results while building stronger bonds between dogs and their owners. Erin practiced her craft in Chicago for many years as a Senior Trainer for AnimalSense Canine Training & Behavior. There she taught dog training classes and also conducted private, in-home lessons with pets and their owners. In March 2015, Erin relocated to Colorado and is excited to share her knowledge and expertise with dog owners in the Denver/Boulder metro area.

Winter activities, part 4: Rally

rally-copy

By Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA

In part three of my Winter Activities series, I talked about Nose Work and how much fun scent work can be. In part four, I am going to talk about the sport of Rally.

I loved working on Rally courses with Bailey. It was a great way to see what commands we needed to work on; it provided treats for her, which she always loved; and allowed us time together, which I always loved.

Rally is another registered AKC sport and any dog six months or older can participate. A Rally course is set up with 10 to 20 stations and is set up differently by every judge. Each station has a sign with instructions on the skill that should be performed. An example of instructions could be, “sit stay”, “call front – return to heel,” etc. The handler can use any verbal commands, hand signals, talk to their dog as much as they want and use any means of encouragement (except treats). The handler cannot use physical corrections or touch the dog. The idea is to complete the course correctly.

I love Rally because it is a great way to work on some basic obedience skills with your dog.

Whenever you work with your dog, you are also working on building a relationship with them, so it is a great bonding experience. And who doesn’t like a dog who knows basic obedience and practices polite behavior?

Another reason I love Rally is because you can practice anywhere. You can make up a course in your house, backyard, park, etc. You can practice inside when the weather is horrible or outside when it is lovely. And any dog can benefit from this sport. I love to keep dogs working. It tires them out, and gives them something more productive to do than getting into trouble. And as I said before, creates a great opportunity to bond with you.

Rally has become very popular, so it is very easy to find a program near you. Classes are fun and create a great way to meet other dog lovers and competitions are a hoot. Handlers and dogs really get into the competitions and they are a great way to spend a cold afternoon.

If you are interested in finding a Rally class or learning more about it, check out the official website.

Have you tried Rally? What was your experience?

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Erin Schneider 250x300rin Schneider, CPDT-KA and owner of Touch Dog Training, is a certified professional dog trainer who employs positive reinforcement behavior modification techniques intended to deliver results while building stronger bonds between dogs and their owners. Erin practiced her craft in Chicago for many years as a Senior Trainer for AnimalSense Canine Training & Behavior. There she taught dog training classes and also conducted private, in-home lessons with pets and their owners. In March 2015, Erin relocated to Colorado and is excited to share her knowledge and expertise with dog owners in the Denver/Boulder metro area.

 

Winter activities, part 3: Nose Work

dog-nose

By Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA

In part two of my Winter Activities series, I talked about barn hunt and the fun that can be had for all. In part three, I am going to talk about the sport of K9 Nose Work.

I LOVE K9 Nose Work. It is probably my favorite dog sport. My dog, Bailey, and I participated in Nose Work for years and she was probably at her happiest when she was working the course. Bailey loved food. She would do anything to get food, so searching for food was just about the most fun thing she could do.

Nose Work is described this way on the official K9 Nose Work websites: “Inspired by working detection dogs, K9 Nose Work is the fun search and scenting activity for virtually all dogs and people. This easy to learn activity and sport builds confidence and focus in many dogs, and provides a safe way to keep dogs fit and healthy through mental and physical exercise.”

If you decide to take a Nose Work class, you will see the room set up with a course filled with boxes. Each dog has to be in a crate while they aren’t working (this ensures that any dog, no matter what their temperament, can participate). While in the course, your dog will be on leash and there will be a treat hidden within a box. The goal is for your dog to sniff around and find the treat. Once they find it, the course is rearranged and another treat is hidden.

Once your dog is confident with the boxes and finding treats easily, everyday objects are added to the course. The goal is to work up to finding scent (usually it is birch) in the course and then to finding scent in open course settings, such as outdoor and cars.

Nose work is probably one of the best activities you can do with your dog.

Any time you can get your dog using their nose the more tired they will be. Any dog can participate in a class. I have worked with dogs with all temperaments, all physical conditions, all ages, sizes, etc. I especially like it during the winter because you can do it anywhere, even the smallest of apartments. All you need is a few boxes and some food. And if you don’t have any boxes, you can always use everyday items. And classes are offered all over the country, so it is very easy to find a location near you.

There were many times I was holed up in my condo during the winter months and I had to find a way to exercise Bailey. K9 Nose Work was guaranteed to get her excited and guaranteed to tire her out. Plus, I never had to leave the comfort of my warm, dry house.

If you are interested in finding a K9 Nose Work class or learning more about it, check out the official website.

Have you tried K9 Nose Work? What was your experience?

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Erin Schneider 250x300Erin Schneider, CPDT-KA and owner of Touch Dog Training, is a certified professional dog trainer who employs positive reinforcement behavior modification techniques intended to deliver results while building stronger bonds between dogs and their owners. Erin practiced her craft in Chicago for many years as a Senior Trainer for AnimalSense Canine Training & Behavior. There she taught dog training classes and also conducted private, in-home lessons with pets and their owners. In March 2015, Erin relocated to Colorado and is excited to share her knowledge and expertise with dog owners in the Denver/Boulder metro area.