Emergency prevention, planning, & protocols for dog walkers

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This article was originally published in the dog*tec blog. 

Taking care of other people’s best friends means living with the chilling prospect of emergencies. Dog walking emergencies can come in all shapes and sizes, from a vehicle break down to a sprained ankle to potentially traumatic accidents. Out on a trail, an otherwise reliable dog takes off chasing an unknown scent and is lost or hit by a car. Two dogs who normally play well together get into a nasty fight. A dog you are walking swallows a rock or other non-edible item whole. All are scenarios that make dog walkers sweat. But failing to consider and prepare for accidents makes them more likely and will only aggravate an already bad situation if it happens.

Your clients, the dogs, your staff, yourself—everyone is better served by a 3 P’s approach—taking deliberate care to prevent emergencies, planning for their eventuality (life does happen, after all), and having set protocols to follow for each type of emergency to stave off panic and keep things under control.

Emergency prevention

Preventing emergencies is much easier than dealing with them. And preventing emergencies is really a matter of following good dog walking practices:

Set the tone. A dog who is calm and focused on you is less likely to be involved in an emergency. Consistently asking your charges sit to greet you and leash up, sit and wait at doorways and curbs, walk nicely on a loose leash instead of pulling, etc. will make your days both easier and safer.

Walk dogs, don’t socialize them. You can’t bite what you’re not near enough to reach. Live beings—both humans and other dogs—are unpredictable. Use strong recalls and focus techniques (like “Let’s go!” or “Watch me!”) to keep dogs interacting with you instead of strangers or dogs you don’t know. When appropriate, pull over to the side for a focused sit-stay to allow others to pass. Politely decline requests to pet your dogs, even if you know them to be friendly. They may well be, but every dog has her limits and you never know when a well-meaning but blundering dog lover will find one of them.

Practice good screening and group composition. Choosing the right dogs—and matching them carefully if you’re a group walker—can go a long way toward avoiding fights and other emergencies. Always decline dogs with behavioral challenges that are beyond your skill and knowledge set, and avoid more than one challenging dog (we call them project dogs) per group, at most.

Actively monitor and interrupt. When walking groups, interrupt play or other interactions before they tip into conflict. Frequent obedience breaks (such as practicing circle stay pull-overs), and calling dogs (recall off leash or “Let’s go!” on leash) to break up potentially heated interactions, keeps things light and fun. Think of it a bit like monitoring a group of children—it’s best to initiate a break in play before a squabble breaks out.

Keep up on vehicle maintenance. The only thing worse than your car breaking down is your car breaking down with dogs in it! Maintain roadside assistance, schedule routine maintenance, and head to the shop at the first sign of trouble. Treat your vehicle like the key business investment and tool it is.

Watch the temperature. NEVER leave dogs in your car other than to pick up other dogs. Keep your keys with you, and the windows cracked. If you live in a particularly warm area, outfit your windows with dog-proof screens that keep dogs in, hands out, and air flowing.

Use proper equipment. To avoid a startled dog breaking free from you, secure leashes to head harnesses, body harnesses, or martingale-style anti-slip collars. Never use flexi-leashes, as they are too easily pulled out of your hand by a bolting dog, and can also cause serious injury to you and the dogs you walk. Be sure all dogs wear a large tag with your cell number to expedite a quick reunion with a lost dog.

Emergency planning

Being prepared keeps emergencies contained when they do happen. Better a small emergency than one that blooms into a crisis.

Carry a 1st aid kit—and know how to use it. Keep a full kit in your vehicle and a small kit on your person as you walk. Visit DogSafe or PetTech websites for canine 1st aid kit information and to look for 1st aid classes if you are not already certified.

Always have client contact information on hand. You should never have to rummage frantically through your vehicle for your phone list or, perish the thought, go home to get it. Keep up-to-date, well-organized client contact details in your car or phone at all times, and require any staff to do so as well.

Program emergency vet phone numbers into your phone. Write down or program into a work phone emergency directions to the closest vets from your most-used trails or the neighborhoods you service and keep them in any car ever used to transport dogs. Make sure all staff members know where to find the directions and understand them. Even if you work solo and you know the directions well, have them pre-programmed into your phone or GPS. When a crisis hits, it’s all too easy to forget one’s own name, let alone how to get to the veterinary hospital.

Get permission to help in writing. Your client service contract should clearly spell out what’s expected of you in an emergency.

  1. Have clients give you permission to seek emergency treatment and agree to cover the cost.
  2. Have clients specify whether there’s a cap on the cost they will accept. (Don’t assume everyone shares your willingness to take out a second mortgage to pay for surgery.)
  3. Have clients specify whether they authorize you to take the dog to whichever vet or animal hospital is closest. In other words, they want you to exercise discretion in getting their dog the best, fastest care. Otherwise, they may refuse to pay because you didn’t use their vet.
  4. Have clients state their wishes with regards to resuscitative care. For example, some clients may not wish to have senior dogs resuscitated.

Recruit an emergency assistant. One way to prevent panic in an emergency is to have a person to call who can help you keep calm and assist with urgent tasks. Don’t just make a mental list of cool-headed friends, though. Your emergency assistant must know and agree to his or her new designation, and the two of you should set up a protocol for such calls. Maybe it’s her job to meet you at the vet clinic and provide general support. Maybe she is the one who takes the other dogs home. Maybe she finishes your walking stops for the day. Whatever it is, you always know that someone can come to your aid. You and a fellow dog pro can do this for each other, or you can ask a friend who works from home or has a flexible office schedule.

Take your emergency assistant out with you on your regular rounds so she can meet all the dogs. Then practice your emergency protocol with your assistant to make sure everything goes as planned when you really need it to.

Emergency protocols

Knowing what to do in an emergency will help keep you calm. And being calm will allow you to more effectively handle whatever situation comes your way.

At the Dog Walking Academy we provide step-by-step protocols for handling all manner of emergencies, including vehicle breakdowns, you being injured or becoming ill during a walk, a dog in your car biting another dog or person, and losing a dog. We encourage our grads to carry these protocols with them, giving them a clear path forward should panic or shock set in. If you don’t have specific emergency protocols, take some time to develop them—or come join us for the Dog Walking Academy.

Secure dogs and call your emergency assistant. Regardless of the situation, one important step in any protocol when walking groups is to secure all dogs to keep the situation from escalating. The last thing you need while dealing with an injured dog or sprained ankle is for another one to take himself off on an adventure. Get everyone safely leashed if they aren’t already, then call your emergency assistant. In most protocols, your emergency assistant is the first call you’ll make. Knowing someone is in your corner and on the way to help can do a lot to bring calm, no matter the emergency.

Communicate with the client. Call the client when you have calmed down, not before. Also hold off until you know the precise nature of the damage. Sprained leg or amputation? Eye patch for a few days or blindness? Best to find out before you make the dreaded call. When you do, speak in a calm, confident tone. A distressed owner needs to know a professional is in charge of the crisis. Clearly state whether everything is handled and this is just a courtesy call to let the client know, or whether some action on her part is required.

With any kind of mishap, even if everything turned out fine, the best policy is to tell the client. Some clients might not care that their dog was missing for 20 minutes on a deer-chasing adventure, or that he got into a scuffle in which no one was hurt, but that risk is preferable to a client who hears it from someone else and is outraged at your failure to tell her about the dramatic event, regardless of the outcome. And if running off or scuffles become a trend, your client may be angry to learn something’s been brewing and wonder why you didn’t let her know sooner.

Take responsibility as appropriate—you are an adult and a professional. But don’t verbally rub sand in your hair, don’t heap blame on yourself, and don’t ever tell the client they ought to sue you. Accidents happen. Dogs are not appliances.

Depending on the situation, here is a possible strategy for the conversation: describe in a straightforward manner exactly what happened, share all the steps you took to handle the situation, give a report of the current status of the dog, and share anything you plan to do (if relevant) in the way of policy or process changes to avoid something similar happening in the future. Stress your concern for the dog’s and the client’s well-being, and ask if there’s anything else you can do to be of support at this particular moment.

Emergency follow-up

If the worst happens and a dog is seriously injured or killed while under your care, let your other clients know in writing. Bad news travels fast and if you are not the one to tell them, they may think you’re trying to hide the episode. You have to protect your business and your brand, and honesty is the best policy.

The letter should include any policy changes you are making to prevent the same thing happening again. Be thoughtful about protecting anonymity; don’t hang clients out to dry. If a dog is expelled, for example, don’t name that dog. If a dog is killed, find out whether the owner wants the dog named or not. Some do, some don’t. But don’t name the dog who killed, just say he was expelled.

Openness is the best policy about smaller incidents, too. A scuffle in a walking group that results in a dog needing a couple of stitches, for example, should also be communicated. Doing so breeds confidence, prevents rumors from festering and growing, and demystifies normal canine behavior. Emphasize what is being done about the problem: “We had another tiff over tennis balls today, so we have decided not to bring them to the beach with us anymore.” Hopefully, you are communicating with your clients every week anyway (highlights from Fido’s week, etc.), so bad news isn’t the only news they get.

(Of course, if scuffles happen more than once in a blue moon, something is wrong. Screening procedures and staff training are the first places to look for a possible issue.)

Don’t fret

If you generally run a strong business, if you take good care of dogs and of people, if you handle a crisis with responsibility and grace, it’s rare to lose clients over injury incidents. Be open and honest, be calm, and face the situation down—it can happen to anyone.

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How much water should your dog be drinking?

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By Emily Bruer

It’s important for us to know what is and what isn’t normal for our pets. Things like water intake, appetite and energy levels can be indicative of your pet’s health and well-being. If your dog’s habits suddenly change it could be due to a medical condition or a change in his environment.

The answer to “how much water your dog should drink?” is far from a straightforward one. Each dog is unique in size and metabolism and each dog’s water intake will be different. The best way to know how much your dog should drink is simply by observing him.

It’s normal for dogs to drink after exercise, eating, and sleeping. They also will drink sporadically throughout the day, so get to know your dog’s habits when he is healthy.

Another great way to know if your dog is drinking enough water is by checking his urine. Stand near your dog when he is urinating; if there is a strong odor to the urine, or it seems to be a dark yellow or orange color, it could mean that your dog is dehydrated. Similarly, if the urine is pink or red it is an indication of blood in the urine and you should get your dog to the vet right away, as they could have an infection or stones in their bladder.

Another great way to test your dog’s hydration levels is by gently lifting the scruff (the skin on the back of your dog’s neck) until it is taut, and then letting it go. If it immediately falls back into place your dog is hydrated, but if it takes longer than a few seconds your dog could be dehydrated.

If you believe your dog is dehydrated, but he isn’t interested in drinking water, a trip to the vet is in order. When an animal is dehydrated for too long it can cause damage to the kidneys as well as other internal organs. Better safe than sorry when it comes to hydration and your dog’s health!

Water temperature – When offering your dog water one thing to keep in mind is the water’s temperature. While it is tempting to give your dog ice cold water, it’s actually much healthier to let your dog have water that is room temperature.

When a warm dog ingests ice cold water their body must then use valuable energy to warm up the water. If it doesn’t, it can cause your dog to have a tummy ache or even throw up.

Not too much –  Another common cause of vomiting in dogs is drinking too much water. If you have just brought your dog in from a hot day or from a bout of vigorous play, his first instinct will be to drink a lot of water.

Unfortunately, if they have access to an unlimited supply they will often drink too much and then proceed to puke it back up. It can also cause a condition called bloat. You can find the symptoms here.

To prevent too much water intake, offer your dog several small bowls of water every 10-15 minutes until they are cooled off and relaxed. Once they have calmed down, you can put their normal water bowl back down and let them have access to the unlimited supply.

Every dog is different when it comes to water intake and bathroom habits. Get to know your dog’s routine while he is young and healthy, so you can recognize potential problems as he ages. If you notice an abnormal change in your dog’s routine don’t put off calling your vet, as what could be a simple infection could quickly get worse without treatment.

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emily-bruer-pawedinEmily Bruer has been penning the adventures of her imagination since she was old enough to hold a pencil. Working at animal shelters for the last five years she learned an incredible amount about animal care and behavior. She is currently employed at a vet clinic where she continues her animal education. Emily’s love of animals is evident when you step into her home, which she shares with six dogs and six cats, all of whom were rescues.

Three unexpected things you need to know to keep your dog healthy

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By Betsy Lane, MA, Education and FetchFind Academy Instructor

We all know the basics of dog care – good food, exercise, regular vet checkups, and sound safety & training practices. But did you know about these three things that can have a big impact your dog’s health?

Getting to the bottom of anal glands

Let’s just get this one out of the way: Anal glands are two little sacs that sit just inside a dog’s anus. They’re filled with super stinky stuff that contains pheromones, and when your dog passes a (firm) stool, some of this material gets squeezed out with the poo. A generation or two ago, dog owners were encouraged to empty these sacs (express the glands by squeezing them) on a routine basis; this was often done by a groomer, vet, or vet tech—or even by brave owners themselves! Like most vets today, Dr. Karen Becker, DVM, advises against fixing what isn’t broken: “If your pets don’t have anal gland problems right now, tell your vets and groomers to please leave them alone. Do not automatically express your pet’s anal glands.”  How do you know when something’s wrong? The most common signs are the dog biting at his or her bottom and/or scooting along the floor on his or her behind. If you see either of these behaviors, it’s time to call your vet.

Poisons! So much more than just chocolate.

Most dog owners know to keep their pups away from chocolate, but in fact coffee and caffeine are also toxic to dogs, because all three contain methylxanthines, which can cause everything from panting and excessive thirst to abnormal heart rhythm and even death. The poison experts at the ASPCA have compiled a list of more than 15 common food items that are toxic to dogs,  including xylitol (a sweetener hidden in everything from breath mints to peanut butter), avocado, citrus, macadamia nuts, and cheese (yes, cheese!). And while we’re on the subject, please put this number in your phone: ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Phone Number: (888) 426-4435.

Mats: Much more than an eyesore.

We’ve probably all seen the “before and after” videos of miserable-looking dogs covered in matted fur–and the amazing transformation that comes after the dog receives some grooming TLC! Even in mild cases, we know matted fur doesn’t look good–but it doesn’t feel good, either, and can pose very real health risks to dogs. Dr. Julie Horton, DVM, says, “matted hair can lead to severe medical problems for pets,” including skin irritations, lesions, and even maggots! As if that’s not bad enough, mats collect debris, feces, and urine, trapping it next to a dog’s sensitive skin. Mats are a painful, unhealthy, expensive road nobody wants to travel—and they can be avoided with proper coat care. Get started by asking groomer about the best tools for your dog’s at-home maintenance, then augment that routine with regular appointments with an experienced professional groomer (every 4 to 6 weeks is a good rule of thumb). PetSmart® Grooming Salons take reservations online, have 1000s of locations, often have coupons, and always have a Look Great Guarantee!

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https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon
Learn more at https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon

How to prevent your dog from overheating

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By Emily Bruer

It’s officially HOT outside, and it’s important that you have a plan to keep your dog comfortable and prevent overheating during these sweltering summer months. While it is true that some breeds are more susceptible to the heat than others, it’s a good idea to have a plan for your dog no matter his breed.

The most important thing to remember this summer is that your dog has no way of expressing to you that he is overheating. In fact, he may not even know. A dog that is having fun playing in the sun is similar to a small child, and as long as he is enjoying himself he’ll keep playing long after it’s safe.

Here are some important tips to keep in mind as you and your pup enjoy the summer.

Be sure to keep a bowl and water with you at all times. Keeping yourself and your furry friend hydrated is the first step to beating the heat this summer. It’s good to keep in mind that ice cold water, though it feels refreshing to us, can be a little hard on a dog’s stomach. It’s best to give them water that is below or at room temperature.

Make sure your pooch has access to shade. It is often up to 10 degrees cooler in the shade. So, if you notice your pooch is panting excessively it may be time for him to take a break until his breathing is back to normal.

Never leave your dog unattended in the car. If the temperature is over 70 degrees outside, the car will quickly become too hot for your dog. Even if you are just running inside for a few minutes you never know what could keep you in the store, and while you are cool inside it’s easy to forget your companion is outside overheating.

Don’t give your dog large meals when it’s hot outside. Like us, a large meal on a hot day can cause a dog to get an upset stomach and possibly even cause him to vomit or have diarrhea. Both conditions can cause dehydration, so it’s best to feed smaller meals throughout the day.

Kiddie pools. Kiddie pools are a great way for your dog to stay cool while outside in the summer. You can usually get them for about $10-20, and your dog will thank you for it. Be sure to change the water every 2-3 days, or sooner if you see it’s dirty.

Be mindful about exercise. Try to only exercise your dog in the early morning or evening when temperatures are cooler. Also, never let dogs walk on hot pavement as they could burn their paw pads. If it is over 90 degrees outside your dog should be inside where it is cool, or calmly relaxing in the shade.

If you are following all these tips but notice your dog is panting excessively and can’t seem to cool off, it’s important you get him inside as soon as possible. Sometimes heat exhaustion can sneak up on us and it can be very dangerous for our dogs.

Offer your dog water and soak two towels with cool water. Have your dog lie on one towel and drape the other over his back. If you’re outside with no access to towels, immerse your dog gradually in cool water (such as a fountain or stream). 

If you have a thermometer, take his temperature. The normal temperature for a dog is about 100-101.5F;  if your dog’s temp is over 104F, get him to the vet immediately.

Overheating can cause seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, and a plethora of other uncomfortable symptoms. Getting him to your vet will allow them to cool him down safely while also providing fluids to prevent dehydration.

Brachycephalic dogs like Pugs, French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs, and other smooshed faced breeds are extremely susceptible to overheating, as they have a harder time breathing than the average dog. Double-coated dogs like Malamutes and Saint Bernards can also have a hard time in the summer heat, so take extra care to make sure they stay cool.

The best tip for preventing heat stress this summer – leave your dog at home during the day, in a cool, climate-controlled environment. Take him out in the early morning and late evening for exercise, and keep potty breaks short during the worst of the heat.

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emily-bruer-pawedinEmily has been penning the adventures of her imagination since she was old enough to hold a pencil. Working at animal shelters for the last five years she learned an incredible amount about animal care and behavior. She is currently employed at a vet clinic where she continues her animal education. Emily’s love of animals is evident when you step into her home, which she shares with six dogs and six cats, all of whom were rescues.

How to toilet train your cat

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By Emily Bruer

Do you hate cleaning the litter box every day? Are you sick of finding litter all over your house? Do you have trouble masking that pervasive litter box smell? If so, it’s time for you to toilet train your cat.

While toilet training a cat may sound difficult (especially because they don’t have opposable thumbs), with the right tools your cat will be out of the box and onto the pot in no time!

1. The first step in toilet training your cat is simply moving the litter box into the bathroom. This will get your cat used to going into the bathroom to do his business and it will get him used to the noises and sounds of toilet flushing and the shower.

If your cat’s box is already in the bathroom skip to step 2. If not, wait a week before moving on.

2. Before you move to the toilet phase, you will want to get your cat transitioned to a flushable litter like a grass or corn litter. You will want to slowly transition your cat to the new litter by slowly mixing it in with the current over the course of a week. Every day take out a scoop of the old and add in a scoop of the new until only the new is in the box. 

If you were already using a flushable litter, skip to Step 3.

3. This step is the messiest, but don’t give up yet! For this step you will need either an aluminum roasting pan or a Litter Kwitter.

If you chose an aluminum roasting pan you will need to duct tape it to your toilet and cover any gaps with plastic wrap, then fill the bottom of the pan or the Litter Kwitter with the flushable litter.

It’s likely that your cat will get litter all over the place during this stage as she is jumping up and potentially trying to dig more than she needs to.

Move to step 4 after about a week.

4. Cut a small hole in the center of your roasting pan or remove the first section of the Litter Kwitter. Be sure there is still litter surrounding the new hole as having no litter will confuse your kitty.

Give her about a week to 10 days to get used to this and then move on to step 5.

5. Cut a slightly larger hole in the center of the roasting pan and remove the second section of the Litter Kwitter. You will leave it like this for about a week to 10 days, and then repeat. Continue cutting and removing pieces of the Litter Kwitter until the hole is the same size as the toilet’s opening.

Proceed to Step 6.

6. Now that there isn’t any litter left in the pan (or the Litter Kwitter), you can remove either apparatus and let your kitty use the toilet.

Keep in mind during this process that your kitty may have accidents or struggle a bit. If you find your cat is struggling don’t be afraid to go back a step or two until she is comfortable.

No one wants potty time to be stressful, and if your cat is too stressed out by her new potty arrangements she could develop bad habits. If your cat is older, getting steps that lead up to the toilet can be helpful as arthritic joints may have trouble jumping up. Getting a toilet seat cover that has some texture to it can help as well. Be sure to always leave the lid up after toilet training your cat or she will likely have accidents.

While some cats take quickly to toilet training, others can take a little longer, so be patient. Toilet training in a multi-cat household can be a bit of a challenge, too, so don’t be afraid to wait a little longer between steps. If you cat is extremely skittish, she may never adjust to using the toilet. In that case, try out some of the covered or auto-cleaning litter boxes that are on the market.

With a lot of patience, a little luck, and some dedication your kitty could be the next toilet trained sensation in your neighborhood. Good luck and never give up on your feline friend.

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emily-bruer-pawedinEmily Bruer has been penning the adventures of her imagination since she was old enough to hold a pencil. Working at animal shelters for the last five years she learned an incredible amount about animal care and behavior. She is currently employed at a vet clinic where she continues her animal education. Emily’s love of animals is evident when you step into her home, which she shares with six dogs and six cats, all of whom were rescues.

Where do I begin? Launching your successful career with animals

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By Betsy Lane, MA, Education and FetchFind Academy Instructor

You want a career working with animals, but how do you make that happen? What training do you need, and where can you get it? Where do you even begin?

Let’s get started by checking out three great options for very different animal-related careers: PetSmart Grooming Academy (for groomers), the Penn-Foster Career School (for veterinary assistants), and FetchFind Academy (for dog trainers).

If your ultimate goal is to be a dog groomer, be sure to check out the PetSmart Grooming Academy. The in-person training offered in this industry-leading program is rigorous and thorough, virtually guaranteeing you’ll graduate feeling prepared and confident as a groomer—whether you’re launching your first career or making a career change. Students and teachers alike have high praise for the program’s curriculum, its focus on safety, and the supportive training environment. (See this blog’s earlier posts for interviews with a trainer and two students.)

Maybe you aspire to working as a veterinary assistant. If so, don’t miss the Penn-Foster Career School’s online veterinary assistant program—one of just three such programs approved by the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA). Why does that matter? Because a whopping 87% of employers reported being more likely to hire a graduate of a NAVTA-approved Veterinary Assistant program! Penn-Foster offers an award-winning staff and a convenient combination of self-paced online training and hands-on training at the veterinary clinic of your choice.

If you’ve set your sights on becoming a dog trainer—either teaching group classes, training dogs in a shelter or daycare environment, or working one-on-one with private clients—you need to know about FetchFind. Providing both online and in-person courses, FetchFind’s curriculum was developed by professional dog trainers working in diverse dog-training settings. You’ll build a strong foundation in FetchFind’s online Behavior Fundamentals course, then increase your skills and expertise via in-person courses such as Essential Training Skills and Advanced Academy. The program provides a thorough education in theories and techniques supported by current animal behavior research—and proven through decades of experience among FetchFind’s faculty and staff.

Ready to begin? Just pick a path, do some research, and start your journey today! Your dream career is out there. Go fetch it!

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https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon
Learn more at https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon

 

Thanks to you – we did it!!

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I’ve always said that we have the best community in the world.

And it’s thanks to this community that we were able to meet – and exceed – our goal for the Republic equity crowdfunding campaign.

  • 217 investors
  • 222% funded
  • $111,161 raised

I won’t lie to you – the last four months have been a roller coaster of emotions and soul-searching. Just getting to the point where we could launch the campaign was a hard, tough slog (and boy did we learn a few things along the way). But the rewards of the campaign go far beyond the funding – we’ve tightened up our processes, met amazing investors and pet industry pros, and drilled down to our core values and company mission.

And now – after a weekend of catch up and, yes, a nap! – we’re back at it with new ideas and new perspectives on how we can make FetchFind an even better tool for pet pros across the world.

We wouldn’t be here without you.

With love and endless gratitude,

JM Sig copy

A clean litter box = a happy cat

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By Emily Bruer

For many cat owners, the litter box is the bane of cat ownership. It smells, litter goes everywhere, and cleaning it is no fun at all. However, keeping your cat’s litter box clean is extremely important to her psyche as well as her health.

In the wild, cats are very careful with their waste. When urinating and defecating, they are normally very careful to dig and bury their urine and feces. This behavior has two reasons behind it.

The first is that in the wild smaller cats are often preyed upon by larger predators such as coyotes, wolves, owls, eagles, and other large birds and mammals. In an effort to keep their presence hidden from predators, cats keep their scent hidden. Only the large-and-in-charge male cats or extremely territorial females will mark their territories by spraying – and even this marking puts them at risk.

The second reason is that cats are predators themselves. In order to keep their prey from smelling them and knowing they are in the area, they bury their excrement. This keeps cats incognito, and reduces the likelihood that their prey will smell their presence before they are close enough to pounce.

So what does a wild cat’s habits have to do with our domesticated friends?

Indoor cats retain many of the instincts they had when they were wild. Luckily for us, burying their output is one of the instincts they retained.

Now – imagine you are a cat. Would you want to go to the bathroom in a dirty litter box?

As cats dig in the box for a place to go, the last thing they want is their paw to hit a past deposit. This is why if you have a large litter box, you will find that your cat mostly fills up the top portion. She doesn’t want to dig too deep and risk hitting anything yucky.

If you let your litter box get too dirty, chances are your cat will start going either next to the litter box or in another part of your home.

While it’s easy to get mad at your cat for this, you only have yourself to blame. No one likes to use a dirty bathroom, and our meticulously clean feline friends are no different.

Imagine if you had to walk into a dirty porta-potty barefoot, and then lick your feet clean when you were done. It’s pretty gross, and that’s how your cat feels every time she has to use her dirty litter box.

If your cat has started urinating or defecating outside the litter box, the best thing you can do is clean the spot with an all natural enzyme cleaner like Nature’s Miracle. This cleaner is actually made up of good bacteria that will eat away the things that are on or in your carpet; in this case, cat urine and leftover fecal particles. This will almost completely eliminate any lingering odors, and will hopefully prevent your cat from wanting to go in the same place again.  

The good news for you if you hate cleaning the litter box is that there are several types of automatic litter boxes on the market. While they are significantly more expensive than your average litter box, they are more than worth it if scooping poop isn’t really your thing.

When choosing which one to buy, be sure to read reviews and pick one that you think your cat will like. I also suggest getting one that can use any brand of litter.

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If you don’t want to get an automatic litter box or diligently clean a regular one, consider potty training her! Potty training cats can be a challenge at first, but once they get the hang of it you can say good bye to litter boxes for good.

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emily-bruer-pawedinEmily has been penning the adventures of her imagination since she was old enough to hold a pencil. Working at animal shelters for the last five years she learned an incredible amount about animal care and behavior. She is currently employed at a vet clinic where she continues her animal education. Emily’s love of animals is evident when you step into her home, which she shares with six dogs and six cats, all of whom were rescues.

Building a great career, step by step

By Betsy Lane, MA, Education and FetchFind Academy Instructor

Madi Correa - Dakota HandLike many dog pros, Madi Correa grew up with dogs. From an early age, she knew she wanted a career working with animals, and—like many people—thought that meant being a veterinarian. (For other career paths with dogs, check out FetchFind Monthly Pro.) Becoming a vet is still Madi’s ultimate career goal, and she has begun her journey by enrolling in an online veterinary assistant training program and attending PetSmart’s Grooming Academy. Recently, Madi took time out to answer a few questions about her training, work, and how all the pieces fit together to move her towards her professional goals.

Fetchy:  What brought you to where you are today, as a student in PetSmart’s Grooming Academy? Did you apply to a number of programs, or just this one?

Madi:  Actually, I started out studying human psychology and then criminal justice—but once I decided to pursue a career with animals, I knew I only wanted to work here, because when I asked the vet techs at my pets’ clinic for advice, they spoke so highly of this program.

Fetchy:  What was your first job here?

Madi:  I started as a bather. Then, after just a few months, I unexpectedly had the chance to be assessed for the grooming program. There were 17 applicants for only 6 slots. The assessment process was challenging, but I did really well, and got in!

Fetchy: On a typical day, about what percentage of your time is working with animals, and what percentage is with people?

Madi: It’s about 80% animals and 20% people. I like that balance. As long as we’re busy, it’s good!

Fetchy:  Your ultimate career goal is to become a vet. How will what you’re learning here benefit you in a veterinary clinic?

Madi:  One part of our training is learning to recognize the signs of stress in dogs, and learning these and [more generally] how dogs might react or behave in different situations will really help. Even if you start out as a dog bather, or just want to be a better dog owner, you’ll be better prepared knowing the critical signs of stress.

Fetchy:  What’s one thing you’ve learned in this program that surprised you?

Madi:  I’ve brought my own dogs to groomers [for years], but I didn’t think about all the aspects of grooming and the different considerations for different types of dogs, different ages, and so on. But now I get it!

Fetchy:  What makes a person successful in this work? What advice do you have for others who want to succeed?

Madi:  You have to love the work, even when it’s challenging. I enjoy it so much, and really feel like I am where I’m supposed to be!

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https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon
Learn more at https://jobs.petsmart.com/salon

It’s all about the community

Moe and Mia
Our wonderful community will help these cuties find a new home. Moe and Mia will be available for adoption (via Chicago Canine Rescue) at our Come for the Pets, Stay for the Tech event on Tuesday, July 11, at 1871 Chicago. 

By Jamie Migdal, CEO of FetchFind

First off, thank you for the outpouring of love for my girl Whisper’s passing. Your emails, Facebook notes, texts, calls, cards, flowers, and gifts will be forever remembered by me and my family. I have said it before, and I will say it again. – I love the pet industry and feel gratitude every day I get to work in this community.

Which brings me to my next point: the three things I appreciate and cherish most about the pet industry are: the people, the innovation, and the passion. And it seems that every day I see more and more of all three things, all wrapped in one gorgeous package of community.

To that point, here’s a lovely blog about some of the ways we have created a pet+tech community here in Chicago. And, by the way, out of our 158 current investors, 80% of the investment has come from you, my community.

I want to challenge, remind, and/or inspire you to think about our industry as a community because in a community all the best things happen.

But you already knew that. 🙂

Together,
JM Sig copy

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republic invest info drop shadow
Campaign ends July 14 ! Learn more – and invest – here:  https://republic.co/fetchfind